Hunters are the driving force for wetland conservation. Why? Because we know conservation is what makes hunting sustainable.

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Photo of oldtime duck hunters

SAVING WETLANDS

California has lost about 95% of its historic wetlands, and much of what’s left is here today only because duck hunters saved it, starting as long ago as the 1880s. An estimated 60% of managed wetlands in California are on private property, and most of that land is owned and maintained by duck hunting clubs.

Members of those clubs spend enormous amounts of money to ensure habitat will be available for the 5 million-plus waterfowl that descend on our state each winter. Maintaining waterfowl habitat can require as much work and investment as growing food crops for people. In conserving that habitat, hunters also create habitat that supports a wide variety of wetland-dependent plant and animal species.

And all hunters—regardless of whether they own duck clubs—put money directly into habitat conservation through hunting license and stamp fees, as well as the 11% Pittman-Robertson excise taxes on firearms and ammunition.

SUPPORTING HUNTERS = SUPPORTING WETLANDS

California Waterfowl was founded by duck hunters in 1945, and duck hunting remains a key priority for the organization. We work to ensure access to public hunting lands, and we provide access to private hunting land through our Hunt Program.

We also help train new hunters, both youth and adult, through a variety of hunter training camps, clinics and workshops.

And California Waterfowl works in the public policy realm to support regulations and laws that don’t stifle responsible, ethical hunting.

Are you ready to support hunting in California?